DUSC Joins Sky Blue FC as Platinum Club Partner

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DUSC Joins Sky Blue FC as Platinum Club Partner

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Sky Blue FC of the National Women’s Soccer League (NWSL) announced that it has entered a Platinum Club Partnership with Downtown United Soccer Club. Based in New York City, Downtown United Soccer Club is organized as a not-for-profit entity to educate, train and inspire youth soccer players of all ages and abilities in a positive, respectful, supportive environment. The club aims to foster a community that reflects the diversity of New York City in which children can develop a lifelong love for the beautiful game and realize their full potential as both players and people.

Sky Blue FC represents New Jersey in the NWSL and features U.S. Women’s National Team captain Carli Lloyd and midfielder Savannah McCaskill; Canada Women’s National Team players Kailen Sheridan and Janine Beckie; Mexico Women’s National Team striker Katie Johnson; New Zealand Women’s National Team defender Rebekah Stott; former NCAA All-Americans such as defender Erika Skroski (Rutgers) and midfielder Sarah Killion (UCLA); as well as 2015 MAC Hermann Trophy winner and Costa Rica Women’s National Team midfielder Raquel Rodriguez (Penn State).

As part of the relationship, Sky Blue FC players will be appearing at DUSC camp the week of August 13th to 17th, prior to Sky Blue FC hosting a DUSC Night on August 18th when the team takes on the visiting Utah Royals FC. DUSC players will receive exclusive experiences throughout the game, including escorting both Sky Blue FC and Utah Royals FC players during the National Anthem and access to a VIP Meet and Greet after the game.

“DUSC is extremely excited about beginning a partnership with our region’s professional club Sky Blue FC,” said Tom Frambach, General Manager at DUSC. “We feel it is important to offer players and families an opportunity to engage with and inspire to the highest level of professional soccer in our country.”

DUSC members, friends and family can purchase discounted tickets: HERE

Additional Sky Blue FC group and individual game tickets are on sale now, and fans can purchase by calling 888.SBFC.TIX (888.723.2849).

For all of the latest news on Sky Blue FC, follow on social media: @SkyBlueFC

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The View from England

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The View from England

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Program Director Adam Norse discusses his history, Rovers, England — and penalty kicks

In his various roles for DUSC, Adam has had an enormous and incredibly positive impact on the club. In this brief interview, he talks about growing up in Blackburn, coming to the US and to DUSC, and what it’s like to watch England in the World Cup this summer. He also gives us some insight into what England are doing differently this time around, and how learning from them may benefit the US.

You are from Blackburn, in northern England. What are your earliest memories of football?

Blackburn is an industrial mill town (population 100,000). Our team, Blackburn Rovers, was one of 23 founder clubs of the English league in 1878. Football is the heartbeat of the town. When the team is doing well, everybody is in an upbeat mood! My earliest memories were going to watch Rovers with my uncle at age 7 on a Saturday afternoon.  

Were Rovers your team, or did you support another team?

Confession time: growing up Rovers were in the 2nd division, so I supported them as my local team, but I also supported Manchester United, the big city club 30 miles down the road. In the early 1990s a local businessman invested millions of pounds into the team and within 5 years we were the number 1 team in England. A fairy tale of a story! I had a big decision to make as a young boy. My heart was always with Rovers.  We are still the only town to win the Premier League title (1995). Leicester City winning the league in 2016 doesn't come close to our story! 

Can you tell us something about your playing history?

I grew up playing football from a young age at school with a dream of becoming a professional. At 14, I was playing with Burnley FC but unfortunately didn't make the grade. I had other trials over the next few years, but was never offered an apprenticeship. 

Can you tell us something about your coaching history?

In 2001, an organization came to my university in England recruiting potential coaches to spend the summer in America coaching football. Traveling across the USA, coaching soccer and getting paid for it didn't take much thinking about! From there my passion for coaching was born. Since then I have looked to grow and develop as a coach as much as I possibly can, learning from other coaches all the time.

What brought you to the States?

During the global recession, circa 2010, I was working within corporate staffing in the UK. Since no companies were hiring staff, I was offered the chance to come back coaching in the USA for 6 months. During that time I met my wife and have been here in New York ever since.

What do you like best about the States?

I love the fact that it is such a melting pot of cultures and different people. 

What brought you to DUSC?

After meeting Gustavo Palomino and hearing about how DUSC were all about developing players on and off the field,  I knew that I wanted to be a part of the club. I was grateful that Gustavo gave me an opportunity to start coaching his U13 boys team.

What do you like best about DUSC?

I like the fact that we are a community soccer club. Regardless of skill level or ability to pay, there is a home for every player and family. In a big city like New York, where community can be hard to find, this is special. 

England last reached the semis of the World Cup in 1990. What do you remember about that team?

I remember staying up past my bedtime to see David Platt score in extra time to win against Belgium, sending England into the quarterfinals. We ended up losing to West Germany in the semifinals on penalties. The team had flair and were exciting to watch. The whole country was behind the team. Unfortunately, I thought this is how England always played! 

What do you think is making this England team so successful?  Southgate’s willingness to “go young”? Harry Kane’s awesomeness?

I think England have found their identity again after trying to imitate other countries' styles of play for too long.  English players are direct and hard-working, that's in our DNA and our culture. It doesn't mean we can't be skillful or play good football. The main thing is that we play as a team instead of 11 individuals.  No matter how you slice it, we aren't Spain and we aren't Brazil. Gareth Southgate has made the players proud to play for England once again. I think the English people are able to relate to this generation of players much more than over the past 28 years. I think the USMNT can learn a lot from the way England have tuned into their strengths and their true, unique identity. 

What has it been like watching this World Cup?

It's been a lot of fun! I've watched most games on the DUSC summer camp so we have had nearly every country represented. Watching the Colombia game got a little uncomfortable towards the end I must admit! It would have been good to have the USA, Italy and Ireland in the tournament though. 

Do you think England have gotten past their wretched history of penalty shoot-outs? ;-)

I loved that Gareth Southgate embraced the penalty shoot-out as a skill, instead of us just putting it down to luck. He has told his players to "own the process", from the walk from the center circle to the kick itself. I will wait to answer the rest of this question until after the final on Sunday...! 

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The View from France

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The View from France

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A DUSC alumna discusses her time at the club — and beyond

Located in the heart of America’s most cosmopolitan city, DUSC has always been lucky to have players and coaches from all over the world. Nina Gilden was born in France to a Parisian mom and a dad from Brooklyn. Spending her early years going back-and-forth between France and the US, she attended pre-k in Japan and then settled down in NYC for school. She lived in the same rent-stabilized loft her dad had lived in for 36 years — while playing and falling in love with soccer at DUSC.

How long did you play at DUSC?  

I started playing at DUSC when I was 7. My first team was the Cardinals, it was the Recreation League and we played on a small field by the Carmine swimming pool [JJ Walker]. I fell in love with the game and tried out for the U10 Girls travel team, made the team and haven’t stopped playing since. Back then, the only fields at Pier 40 where the roof top and the  indoor field. There was no beautiful center pitch, but rather a huge parking lot with beautiful views of the river and downtown!  Balls were constantly going over into the Hudson or landing on the hoods of cars! Girls soccer in the city has really improved since I started playing in the late 90’s, early 2000’s and it’s exciting to watch so many young girls getting into the beautiful game. Because competition wasn’t extremely high in the girls teams, DUSC made an exception to allow me to also play on the boy’s U-11 team. I loved it! I played until I was 12 with DUSC and then found a competitive girls team in Long Island. I started living somewhat of a double life: going to school in NYC while taking the LIRR six days a week to train and play games with my new club team. DUSC gave me my soccer foundation and the love to play, which I still carry with me today. 

What are your fondest memories playing with the club? 

Pier 40 is and always will be my favorite place in NYC. I’ve watched it develop and grow just as DUSC has also grown and is opening up a fun, competitive and memorable experience for its players. When you are young all you want to do is play with your friends. I felt so lucky to be able to play soccer with my friends, just to kick a ball around and bond with my teammates. 

What life lessons did you learn from playing the beautiful game?  

Hard work pays off! On and off the field, I had to learn time management skills to be able to play and get my homework done. Soccer was a reward. I definitely learned how to be a team player, which helps a lot in the work world. I am also very appreciative of my parents: without my dad I wouldn’t have started playing and without my traveling soccer mom, I could not have made it to any of my soccer practices or games. Plus she’s an awesome cheerleader. Go soccer moms!!

What are you up to now? 

I am a certified art teacher and have been teaching Art and French in the city. At the moment I am also applying to school for Interior Design.

What nationality are you?  

I am half French and American. 

What team are you rooting for in the World Cup? And why?  

France, allez les Bleus! I can’t stop watching highlights of the game against Argentina. Mbappé, wow!!! I also do really love watching Mexico play though, they are fast, technical and great on the counter. 

What interesting things should we know about you?  

I’m naturally a lefty but my dad trained me to play with both feet, he saw it as a great advantage. He made me practice every day and “Fake one way, go the other” has been drilled in my brain. I’m now almost better with my right foot!

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World Cup of DUSC

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World Cup of DUSC

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DUSC is proud of our diversity — a microcosm of our great city — with players, coaches and staff from countries around the globe. This mosaic of cultures, styles and beliefs makes for good soccer, and great people. 

Our global nature is never more apparent, nor more fun, then when the World Cup is played every four years. Below are some of the nations competing and the DUSC family members cheering them on. Which is your team?
 

Argentina

Colombia

England

Germany

Japan

Mexico

Peru

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Parent Night 2018

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Parent Night 2018

Thank you to all of the parents who were able to attend our Annual Parent Night on Tuesday, June 5.

Parent Night is an opportunity to communicate many of our club successes throughout the year, present feedback given by by parents from the Academy Survey, and celebrate together as a  community towards the end of the year.    

A major highlight of the evening is hearing from some of our graduating seniors on some of their stories through the club and the positive impact it had on their life.  

We are thankful to be given the opportunity to work with some exceptional young people and are grateful for your trust.  
 

See our Parent Night 2018 Presentation

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DUSC Players Attend NWSL Game

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DUSC Players Attend NWSL Game

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Girls Academy Celebrates Cinco de Mayo at Sky Blue Game

On May 5, DUSC players and their families from the Girls Academy attended the Sky Blue v. Houston Dash game at Yurcak Field, Rutgers University in Piscataway, NJ. The teams play in the National Women's Soccer League. With rosters drawn from national teams from around the world — including the US's own Carli LloydSavannah McCaskill and Jane Campbell — the game provided the opportunity to see some of the highest level soccer in the U.S. Highlights of the evening included DUSC players serving as player escorts for the Sky Blue and Dash players as they walked onto the field for the national anthem. The players also participated in an on-field half-time parade and received a high-five from Sky Blue President and General Manger Tony Novo.

“It was great to see the DUSC players interacting with the Sky Blue and Dash teams. They have not stopped talking about the conversations they had with ‘their’ player during the walkout to the field. We look forward to partnering with Sky Blue to do more events like this in the future,” said Sarah Dwyer-Shick, Assistant Technical Director for DUSC’s Girls Program and Goalkeeping.

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DUSC Teams Triumph in NY Cup

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DUSC Teams Triumph in NY Cup

DUSC Academy Teams at the NY Cup Championships

In line with our developmental philosophy, our club does not enter State Cup competition until U12 (2006). We are very proud of the accomplishments of all our teams on and off the field, and would like to recognize the achievements of our teams who have made it to the next stage of competition. Best of luck to all teams competing in the semifinals. Play with integrity and play the “DUSC Way”.

Champions

B2006 Blue - Champions (Gold division) 

Semifinals

B2006 Blue — Semi-Finals (Gold division)
B2006 Orange — Semi-Finals (Silver division)
B2004 Orange — Semi-Finals (Silver division)
B2002 Blue — Semi-Finals (Gold division)
B2000 Blue — Semi-Finals (Gold division)
B1999 Blue — Semi-Finals (Silver division)

Quarterfinals

B2006 Blue — Quarterfinals (Gold division)
B2006 Orange — Quarterfinals (Silver division)
B2004 Orange — Quarterfinals (Silver division)
B2002 Blue — Quarterfinals (Gold division)
B2002 Orange — Quarterfinals (Silver division)
B2000 Blue — Quarterfinals (Gold division)
B2000 Orange — Round of 16 (Silver division)
G2000 Blue — Quarterfinals (Gold division)
B1999 Blue — Quarterfinals (Silver division)

 

 B2006 Blue Champions of NY State Cup

B2006 Blue Champions of NY State Cup

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DUSC B2002s in LA for adidas 5v5 national championship

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DUSC B2002s in LA for adidas 5v5 national championship

Members of the B2002's won the 'east coast' UEFA Young Champions League Final hosted by adidas at Upper 90 in Astoria, Queens earlier this spring.  Los Angeles offered a similar competition on the west coast and the two teams squared off in the national final in Los Angeles the weekend of April 29th with the winner going to Kiev for the world final in conjunction with the UEFA Champions League Final.   

The trip commenced by bumping into Mr. LL Cool J in the airport terminal in JFK, who wished the boys well and gave some words of wisdom.  

Landing in LA on Saturday, April 29th the boys had a light training session on the beach with the coaching staff of Venice Beach Football Club (VBC) to prepare for the event the following day.  A good night sleep in downtown Los Angeles was what the doctor ordered to get ready for a busy day on Sunday morning.  

The team arrived to the The Base, LA where the pre-game party for LAFC coincided with the national final.  In a hard fought match, the boys from nyc came up on the short end of the result, losing 3-4 to the west coast representatives.  We are extremely proud of the their accomplishments off the field, but just as proud of the way in which they handled themselves throughout the trip.  

The trip coincided with the home opener of the new professional MLS club LAFC vs. Seattle Sounders, and the boys enjoyed the historical moment.  Being introduced on the field at half time to the sell out crowd of 22,000 people was an experience in itself.  The match ended with a stoppage time winner from the home team,  and a great ending to the evening. 

Similar to the beginning of the trip, the boys bumped into a legend, this time a US Soccer star 'deuce', Clint Dempsey in the airport on the ride home who again offered some words of wisdom and was a great way to end the trip.   

Congratulations to the boys!  

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The DUSC Spring Kickoff Clinic at Pier 40

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The DUSC Spring Kickoff Clinic at Pier 40

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Downtown United Soccer Club hosted the Spring Kickoff Clinic at Pier 40 in Manhattan on Sunday, March 11. More than 60 girls, from within the club and from the outside community, had the opportunity to work with an all-female coaching staff with a highly diverse background in playing and coaching.

The staff for the spring clinic featured coaches with intercollegiate playing and coaching experience at each of the NCAA Divisions, State Youth Soccer staff, regional and state Olympic Development Program staff and a wide range of international tournament and camp experience. DUSC high school students, Katherine Fox, Hallie Hayne and Eva Kellner, also took part as player assistants. 

“We’re thrilled with the community response and excited to see so many girls come out and take part.  For young players to be able to see older players and coaches who have been where they are is so important. They begin to realize the possibilities,” DUSC Girls Assistant Technical Director Sarah Dwyer-Shick said.

DUSC Girls Technical Director Arman Osooli said, “It was a great event for everyone involved. The girls enjoyed the environment and as current coaches and former players an opportunity to inspire the next generation.”

The Kickoff Clinic was the third in a recent series of DUSC events focused on girls’ development. In February, the female DUSC Academy coaches ran the Saturday girls recreational classes, providing participants the opportunity to work with coaches from within the DUSC academy program. Two weeks ago, players and their families attended the She Believes Cup game, featuring the  Women’s National Teams from the US and France at Red Bull Arena in Harrison, N.J.

“The Downtown United Soccer Club Girls Spring Kickoff Clinic was another example of the DUSC commitment to providing the highest quality playing and training environments for girls. With more than 60 girls participating and 11 women coaching and mentoring, it made for an inspirational and fun day at Pier 40,” said DUSC Director of Youth Development Kevin McCarthy.

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Coach Sarah helps bring the DUSC Spirit to Uganda

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Coach Sarah helps bring the DUSC Spirit to Uganda

 Girls from Mulago and Buguyere Deaf schools compete in the 2017 Promoting Play Tournament

Girls from Mulago and Buguyere Deaf schools compete in the 2017 Promoting Play Tournament

In the Fall of 2017, Downtown United Soccer Club donated more than a hundred new uniforms from its recreational program to African children in need. The uniforms went to the Ugandan-based organization Growing the Game for Girls (G3) through DUSC's Sarah Dwyer-Shick and The Sports Bra Project. Lisa Berg, American based Cofounder of G3, delivered the DUSC uniforms and Sports Bras provided by The Sports Bra Project to the organization’s Promoting Play Tournament & Symposium held in Uganda in October.

G3 partnered with three local schools for the deaf in Kampala, Uganda to bring together students to play soccer. G3 committed to training their teachers in coaching soccer. G3 also worked with the schools to sensitize community members to the ability of kids with disabilities to participate in sports. The schools received soccer balls, cones, bibs, sports bras and new uniforms for their girls’ teams from Downtown United Soccer Club, The Sports Bra Project, Woodbury Soccer Club and One World Soccer Balls.

After visits to each school, G3 held a tournament for the girls and a symposium for parents, community members. Over 120 girls age 8–18 competed in a new sport in their new uniforms. The impact continues to grow and G3 continues to work with coaches and find ways to promote play for all girls, no matter what barriers they face.

Growing the Game for Girls (G3) was established in 2010 by Berg and Majidah Nantanda. They were women’s national team coaches in Uganda and wanted to develop soccer for girls and women. The purpose of Growing the Game for Girls is to encourage more girls and women to participate in soccer and to sensitize the community to the equal treatment, non-discrimination, and promotion of opportunities for girls and women in sport. For information on Growing the Game for Girls (G3), click here.

The Sports BraProject was founded in 2017 to provide Sports Bras to female athletes in areas where access to such items is limited and is often one of many barriers to participation. The Sports Bra Project distributes the bras it collects through organizations already operating sports programming in the US and abroad. For information on The Sports Bra Project, click here.

Growing the Game for Girls/Sports Bra Project video

 Ntinda Deaf School had the largest number of players participating in the symposium and tournament

Ntinda Deaf School had the largest number of players participating in the symposium and tournament

 Buguyere Deaf School player takes penalty kick against Ntinda Deaf School in the 2017 G3 Promoting Play Tournament.

Buguyere Deaf School player takes penalty kick against Ntinda Deaf School in the 2017 G3 Promoting Play Tournament.

 Growing the Game for Girls Co-founder, and former Uganda Women's National Team Coach, Majidah Nantanda with girls from Buguyere Deaf School.  Girls at the symposium also got snacks and sodas after they compete.

Growing the Game for Girls Co-founder, and former Uganda Women's National Team Coach, Majidah Nantanda with girls from Buguyere Deaf School.  Girls at the symposium also got snacks and sodas after they compete.

 6-12 year old girls from the Mulago School of the Deaf in their new Downtown United Soccer Club jerseys.

6-12 year old girls from the Mulago School of the Deaf in their new Downtown United Soccer Club jerseys.

 Majidah Nantanda conducting the pre-game coin toss with players wearing jerseys and gear donated by clubs in the US.

Majidah Nantanda conducting the pre-game coin toss with players wearing jerseys and gear donated by clubs in the US.

 Players received sports bras and uniforms from The Sports Bra Project and Downtown United Soccer Club.

Players received sports bras and uniforms from The Sports Bra Project and Downtown United Soccer Club.

 Girls from Buguyere Deaf School celebrate their goal against Ntinda in the 2017 Promoting Play.

Girls from Buguyere Deaf School celebrate their goal against Ntinda in the 2017 Promoting Play.

 13-16 year old girls from Mulago School of the Deaf. Girls in Uganda shave their heads for uniformity and cleanliness.

13-16 year old girls from Mulago School of the Deaf. Girls in Uganda shave their heads for uniformity and cleanliness.

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Coach Mauricio Brings the DUSC Spirit to Colombia

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Coach Mauricio Brings the DUSC Spirit to Colombia

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Mauricio Maya has been one of DUSC’s most popular — and most well-respected — coaches since he arrived back in the US five years ago. He had been a student here years earlier prior to coaching sojourns in Mexico and France. Having coached in four countries gives him a unique perspective: 

“In Colombia and Mexico you have the passion but no facilities, no money. In the US, you have money but, historically at least, little passion. In France you have passion and the facilities, so you see where that has led and the success they have had. But things are changing here in the US, at least from what I can see in New York. Everyone is watching the games on TV, there are pick-up games everywhere, the kids playing with grown-ups and you can see the kids wearing the team shirts wherever you go.”

Mauricio credits the New York parents for the sea change he is observing. “They get the kids where they need to be and they instill in them a love for the beautiful game.”

Each December, Mauricio’s  hometown, Cali has its annual Carnival celebration. He uses the holiday break to recharge his batteries with a trip back, to celebrate the Carnival, enjoy the warmth, see family and friends — and spend some time coaching young footballers from his home town. Prior to each trip, he stuffs his luggage with soccer donations from the club to distribute — shirts, shoes, balls and miscellaneous equipment. This year, a buddy and fellow ex-pat encouraged him to reach out to a different group of youngsters, kids from the inner city, “invasiones”, the Colombian version of Brazil’s favelas.

“These kids live in a very dangerous place, where people are shot and killed randomly and without reason. But when they play none of that matters; when they play they are free.”

Mauricio loved his experience coaching — and playing — this year. His only regret was not bringing more. “They don’t expect anything and when they receive something . . . you see this look in their eyes. It makes such a difference to them.”

Next year he’ll return, with his luggage even more packed. Or maybe he’ll bring some extra luggage.  Click here to donate for a future trip.  #WeAreDUSC

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Happy #GivingTuesday from DUSC

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Happy #GivingTuesday from DUSC

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Today is Giving Tuesday, a global day of giving that kicks off the end-of-year giving season. We are asking that all of our DUSC families consider giving to DUSC today or in the coming month. 

As a 501 c(3) not for profit, we depend on your generosity. At DUSC, it is our philosophy to provide a place for committed individuals to play and learn about soccer-and grow as people-regardless of financial resources. Your donations will provide the best coaches possible for our children, identify and secure much-needed field space, and offer scholarships to 20% of our academy players, which is fundamental to DUSC's core principle of inclusion.

DUSC accepts donations through Firstgiving, and all donations are fully tax-deductible. 

We are thankful for your support.

#WeAreDUSC

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Open Tryouts: DUSC U20/23s (Men + Women)

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Open Tryouts: DUSC U20/23s (Men + Women)

We are pleased to announce that DUSC will be offering U20 + U23 teams in 2018 for both Men + Women.  Lead by Kevin McCarthy, Director of Youth Development at DUSC, the season will run mid May through end of July in conjunction with summer break for college students.  League games will commence during the months of June and July.  Tryouts are open to the public.  

Open Tryouts

Where: Columbia University

When: December 16, 2017

Men: Open to Ages 18–23 (9:00am)

Women: Open to Ages 18–23 (10:30am)

Register here

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Q+A with a DUSC Recreation League Parent Coach

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Q+A with a DUSC Recreation League Parent Coach

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Lou Chiorazzi has been a  parent coach in our DUSC Recreation League since last winter. He took some time to share his experience with us. . . .

How did you learn about the DUSC Recreation League?

I searched online for a larger girls program because the one I was using across town had limited girls, so they mixed 10- to 15-year-olds. I was concerned that my daughter, at the time 10 years old, would be discouraged by the bigger players, and wanted her with similar age and sized girls. I also knew about DUSC from a parent of an Academy player, who I admire, he loves the game and has nothing but good things to say about DUSC. His son also flourished and continues to play today.

Did you have any prior soccer or coaching experience?

Some minor assistant coaching experience in my daughter's prior league, but not prior coaching skill, or major soccer knowledge, just a love and appreciation for the game. When I came to DUSC last season, I coached the Winter Coed league. I really enjoyed the time.

What do you enjoy most about being a parent-coach?

I truly enjoy seeing the players get excited to play the game, and observing the natural teamwork that dynamically forms. The natural love to be sporty, compete and have fun with others. They want to do well, some know how to do that, and some don't. Trying to help find a balance is the most fun for me. It's rewarding to me to provide basic guidance to simple game situations, positioning, passing, shooting, to help build confidence in their game, while encouraging teamwork. Sometimes a little extra attention to teaching a player makes a difference. It's limited time we have on the field, but it's quality time as DUSC provides a laid back and fun environment, with the support of the coaches. A great way to introduce, or continue to encourage players for the game.

What would you say to a parent who is considering coaching this winter but still undecided?

Dive in and just let your natural ability to even consider getting involved, to get involved. Most parents are fully capable of what's needed to coach. Encouraging the players, the teamwork, balancing playing time, and simply cheering. You don't need to know a lot about the game. You'll learn if you get involved. The DUSC coaches will help and the kids can naturally figure out, or know the game anyway. It rubs off on everyone. Coaching at DUSC, less is more in general.  Your simple presence and care for the players will go a long way.

How does your daughter feel about you being her coach?

My daughter is definitely proud that I coach. It's a symbiotic activity for both of us, as I want her to put in more effort to achieve her best, whatever that ends up being regardless of skills and result, and she sees me leading by example to put in the effort with her, and the other players. Showing care is half the battle. I continue to grow a love for the game over the years and think it's the best sport for anyone to play, especially children. The game encourages the players to put in effort and find their way to be effective on the pitch. I've seen work ethic improve, teamwork take shape, relationships build, and sheer enjoyment in the flow of the game, regardless of the final result.  

What does being a part of the DUSC Community mean to you?

DUSC made my daughter and me feel welcome, included and valued to be a member.  An inclusive model with recreational options, camps, skills classes, and a future potential academy option makes DUSC worth committing time to build a player to their maximum potential.

NYCFC or Red Bulls?

#WeAreOne #NewYorkIsBlue #NYCFC! #NuffSaid

If you are interested in becoming a Parent Coach in our Winter Recreation League please let us know. No prior soccer experience necessary! 
 

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Coach Oumou Brings the DUSC Spirit to Mali

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Coach Oumou Brings the DUSC Spirit to Mali

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DUSC is proud of our diversity — a microcosm of our great city — with players, coaches and staff from countries around the globe. This mosaic of cultures, styles and beliefs makes for good soccer, and great people.

Mali is a landlocked country in sub-Saharan west Africa known for its music, its cuisine — and its obsession with soccer. It’s also the birthplace of beloved coach Oumou Toure, who despite her youth, has been a fixture at the club for over a decade.

This summer, Oumou visited Mali. As a young girl she had moved to New York City, following her mom, a chef and restaurateur who had immigrated here to open an African restaurant in Harlem. This was her first time returning, a trip she made with her sister and a cousin.

As a DUSC coach, Oumou was very familiar with Soccer Recycle, an initiative with which the club partners to collect and distribute gently used soccer uniforms and equipment internationally where they are needed. She asked Program Director Adam Norse if he had any equipment she herself could distribute in Mali and he was happy to help, finding her four teams worth of uniforms from our Recreation League.

“When I got there, they didn’t even have pinnies, let alone uniforms. As a DUSC coach it was all so different to me; how did they know who was on the team?” It was an eye opener for a coach used to the privileged environs of downtown Manhattan. “Instead of cleats they were all wearing water shoes to play. The field was just dirt.” 

But the smiles were same, and the joy, the universal language of our game. “They were so happy to get the uniforms and I was so happy to be able to provide them.” The DUSC spirit is spread wide, from here to Timbuktu, and beyond.

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DUSC appoints Sarah Dwyer-Shick as Assistant Technical Director for Girls Program

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DUSC appoints Sarah Dwyer-Shick as Assistant Technical Director for Girls Program

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DUSC is pleased to announce the appointment of Sarah Dwyer-Shick as Assistant Technical Director for its Girls Program

Dwyer-Shick, who brings extensive experience at all levels of youth soccer, will also serve the Manhattan-based club as Assistant Technical Director of Goalkeeping.

During her 15 years collegiate coaching experience, Dwyer-Shick served as a head or assistant coach at each of the three NCAA divisions and is in her third year as assistant men's coach at Dutchess Community College. While she remains passionate about providing resources for players looking to play after high school, and speaks with teams, clubs and players about college soccer and recruiting, her focus is on youth development and creating opportunities for players to grow through the game.

Her sport-for-all passion has taken Dwyer-Shick around the globe, promoting the development of opportunity for girls to play. "Soccer is truly the world's game and has provided me opportunities to see how universal the sport is and the tremendous impact it can have on the lives of young players."

"New York soccer continues to grow and to be at the heart of that development in Manhattan, at an organization that is committed to providing quality education and development opportunities for the youngest recreational players through older competitive teams, is truly exciting."

Dwyer-Shick, played soccer and lacrosse at the collegiate level and holds a Master's degree in Sports Management from the University of Denver. She earned her undergraduate degree from Smith College.

She served for five years as Director of Coaching for New York's Girls North Olympic Development Program (ODP). She also coached with the NY Rush/Patriots Club for eight years and has worked as a consultant with youth organizations throughout Westchester and the Hudson Valley. 

"Sarah brings a lot of experience to the program from both a youth and collegiate perspective and will certainly help take the program to another level" commented Arman Osooli, Technical Director for Girls.  

Dwyer-Shick holds the US Soccer National Youth License and Advanced National Diploma and Advanced National Goalkeeping Diplomas from the National Soccer Coaches Association of America. She is certified as a Strength and Conditioning Specialist by the NSCA.

Welcome to the Club Sarah! 

#WeAreDUSC

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DUSC appoints Kevin McCarthy as Director of Youth Development

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DUSC appoints Kevin McCarthy as Director of Youth Development

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Kevin brings a wealth of experience to DUSC. Having won Ivy League titles as a coach in Columbia University's women's and men's programs, Kevin was selected for a NSCAA Coach of Year Award. He serves on the NY Leadership Council for the  United States Soccer Foundation and was a Founding Director of Next Gen USA and the NYC Soccer Academy. A highly sought-after speaker, Kevin has lectured at many NYC schools, including Columbia, Brooklyn College, Fordham Business School and he has appeared on ESPN, Sirius FM and CNN to discuss the state of American Soccer and youth development.

"Manhattan has been my home for over 30 years and I have navigated the NYC soccer scene as a player, coach, board member, volunteer and parent,” Kevin said. ”DUSC is already a model for holistic and inclusive player development in NYC so I am excited to be involved in supporting and growing the progressive platform of programs that DUSC operates. I am passionate about bringing my value-based approach to DUSC and my initial goal is to build on the strong and positive soccer developmental experience for all the DUSC stakeholders: players, parents, coaches and employees.

"Kevin will be a great addition to the team. His network within NYC and his experience at the collegiate level with both men and women will be a tremendous asset to our players and our community at DUSC" said Tom Frambach, General Manager at DUSC. 

Welcome to the Club Kevin! 

#WeAreDUSC

 

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Thank You for a Great Summer

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Thank You for a Great Summer

After more than 25 years, the summer of 2017 was the best one yet for DUSC Summer Camp, with over 1500 players attending a total of 54 days. Our campers worked on their skills and their fitness, building on their love for the game in a positive, supportive environment. And most important to all of us — they had fun!  We are able to give over $38,000 in financial assistance to those in need this summer to experience the beautiful game.  We are grateful to our footballers and their families for the time they’ve spent with us this summer at DUSC Summer Camp. 

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DUSC G2000 and G2002 Blue Teams Visit Ajax and Frankfurt

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DUSC G2000 and G2002 Blue Teams Visit Ajax and Frankfurt

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This month, our DUSC G2000 and G2002 Blue teams were privileged to travel to Amsterdam and Frankfurt and train with Academy coaches from esteemed AFC Ajax and FFC Frankfurt. Many of them had never traveled to Europe before and doing so with their teammates proved to be an unforgettable experience. Sophie King, a 2001 playing on the 2000 team described it as “traveling the world with my best friends.”

The players were struck by differences in both style of play and coaching in the Europe, noting both an increase in intensity and an overarching emphasis on “the team” in both the Netherlands and Germany. “Everyone pays for mistakes” in practice, just as they would in games. “Everything you do affects the people around you.”

When not training or competing, the girls had time to explore two of Europe's great cities. They felt “Amsterdam completely surpassed our high expectations” as they enjoyed rides along the canals and the beauty of the old city. They were surprised to find that Frankfurt, one of Europe’s major financial hubs and the capital of the European Central Bank, reminded them of downtown Manhattan with its recent glass and steel skyscrapers, and they sought out smaller, more quaint areas. A favorite memory of Frankfurt was of its famed street performers.

A highlight of the trip was going to the UEFA Women’s Euro final between the Netherlands and Denmark. The players didn’t know they’d be attending and it was a wonderful surprise. It was “indescribable”, “very emotional” and “amazing to watch” some of the best players in the world compete for Europe’s crown in the company of their teammates. It was a hard fought match, with the Netherlands, competing at home, defeating underdog Denmark 4-2. 

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Pier 40...What's Next?

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Pier 40...What's Next?

  At a meeting on Pier 40 two months ago, Board Member Isaac Daniel Astrachan of Downtown United Soccer Club presented some of the league's ideas for the pier,  including a modest commercial use,  adding a cafe, and increasing the amount of playing-field space. Photo by Lincoln Anderson

At a meeting on Pier 40 two months ago, Board Member Isaac Daniel Astrachan of Downtown United Soccer Club presented some of the league's ideas for the pier,  including a modest commercial use,  adding a cafe, and increasing the amount of playing-field space. Photo by Lincoln Anderson

Survey says? Community Board 2 to release online poll on future of Pier 40

BY LINCOLN ANDERSON | So far, a series of meetings by a Community Board 2 working group focusing on Pier 40 have not exactly been going gangbusters in terms of drawing crowds of local residents.

To solicit more ideas and concerns about the planned redevelopment of the sprawling W. Houston St. pier, C.B. 2 now will be sending out an e-survey. Tobi Bergman, chairperson of the board’s ad hoc Future of Pier 40 Working Group, said the survey will be going out next week.

Few details were available at press time about the survey’s actual contents or exactly which e-mail lists will be used to distribute it — though, obviously the C.B. 2 list will be used.

In a recent interview, Bergman told The Villager, “We decided to do a survey to give a broader segment of the community a chance to weigh in, because the turnout at these meetings hasn’t been huge — because there hasn’t been anything on the table. Usually people start coming out [to meetings] when there’s a plan on the table.”

Although the Hudson River Park Trust, the waterfront park’s governing authority, has had one or more representatives at the meetings, which have been going for a few months now, so far no concrete plans have been broached by the Trust. What is known is that the Trust wants to redevelop Pier 40 to generate more revenue for both the massive W. Houston St. pier’s maintenance and the wider park, in general.

The Trust has tried, without success, to find ideas for the pier for more than a decade now. Two previous requests for proposals, or R.F.P.’s, from developers for plans to redevelop Pier 40 both went bust after the community opposed the proposals. Those failed ideas ranged from the world’s largest oceanarium during the first R.F.P. to a Cirque du Soleil-centered “Vegas on the Hudson” plan by The Related Companies during the subsequent R.F.P.

This past May, a deal was closed under which the Trust is selling 200,000 square feet of unused development rights from Pier 40 to the developers of the St. John’s Partners project at 550 Washington St. That project will see the old St. John’s Terminal redeveloped into a new residential-and-hotel complex with a significant amount of affordable housing included.

But Pier 40 still has remaining air rights, and if the pier’s current three-story pier shed is demolished, even more development rights will be available to build new structures on the pier.

“The difficult thing,” Bergman said, “will be to try to figure out how to protect the park from another overblown development project” without totally impeding the Trust from trying to redevelop Pier 40 at all.

The main goal of the Trust right now, he said, is to modify the park’s governing legislation, the Hudson River Park Act of 1998, to allow commercial office space to be built at Pier 40. Currently, under the legislation, space equal to 50 percent of the pier’s footprint must be reserved for recreational park use, while the rest of the pier can be used commercially to generate revenue for the park.

“What the Trust has made clear over the years is that they want as much flexibility as they get,” he noted.

The Pioneers team proudly took the field at Pier 40 at a Greenwich Village Little League Opening Day parade a few years ago. The pier’s enormous courtyard sports field is a sacred cow for local families. Villager file photo

But if what the Trust proposes is out of scale, no doubt there will be community backlash.

“If it’s huge, there will be resistance,” Bergman assured. “Scale is a huge issue.”

The former C.B. 2 chairperson and longtime local youth sports and parks activist noted that the pier has a floor-area ratio, or F.A.R., of 2 — meaning that if all the pier’s original development rights were still intact, the entire 15.4-acre pier could be covered solidly with two stories of floor space. Subtracting the 200,000 square feet that were sold to the St. John’s Partners project for $100 million still leaves the pier with a lot of usable development rights.

“You end up with half the floor area of the Empire State Building,” Bergman offered for comparison. “That’s what you could put there. What would be left would be 1.15 million square feet — the Empire State Building is 2.25 million square feet.

“And if you put offices there, you will have to have a certain amount of ancillary stuff — restaurants, cafes, coffee shops,” he noted.

The “density of the office space” will be a key issue, he predicted.

“If 10,000 people are working there, that would be a disaster,” Bergman warned. “Five thousand sounds like it’s still a lot.”

On the other hand, what the pier currently has — recreational park uses (its sports fields) and parking — are uses that have less impact and are less dense in terms of numbers of people on the pier.

Ultimately, Bergman pointed to the language of the park act as the guideline for any redevelopment of the pier. The legislation, he noted, says that “to the extent practicable,” the park will generate income through park commercial uses for the park’s maintenance and operation.

(“It is intended that, to the extent practicable…the costs of the operation and maintenance of the park be paid by revenues generated within the Hudson River Park and that those revenues be used only for park purposes. Additional funding by the state and the city may be allocated as necessary to meet the costs of operating and maintaining the park.”)

Looking at it another way, Bergman said, it isn’t — or shouldn’t be — a question of how much money the Trust wants to milk out of Pier 40, “but what can the park and the community take?”

“We don’t want to fight it again. That’s why we’re doing this,” he said of the working group’s goal of having recommendations for Pier 40 in place by the end of this year.

What is not wanted is another failed R.F.P., which would be “strike three” for Pier 40 after two previous processes tanked, he stressed.

“That would make chances even less likely it’ll happen,” he said. “We want a successful park / commercial project that can generate funds for the park. But,” he added, “the purpose of the park is not to raise money. The park’s commercial part has to be compatible.”

Personally, Bergman said he would have preferred some residential development as a way to raise funds for the park. Around five years ago, a group he helped spearhead, Pier 40 Champions — a coalition of the local youth sports leagues — proposed the idea of building two luxury residential towers near the bike path at the foot of Pier 40 as a revenue generator. But it never got off the ground due to lack of political support. Like office use, it would have needed a legislative amendment, since the park act doesn’t allow residential use. The leagues wouldn’t have built the towers, but they just suggested the idea.

“I thought the answer was a limited amount of residential,” Bergman reflected, “but the politicians didn’t want that, so we conceded that.”

Meanwhile, the Trust is not helping clarify things, in that it isn’t giving any real specifics on what it wants to see at Pier 40.

The Villager asked a Trust spokesperson if she could provide some more details about what the authority is envisioning, but she replied, “On Pier 40, the Trust respects the community board’s process and is not commenting at this point.”

At least one thing that is very clear, though: Bergman doesn’t want any of the potential office employees on Pier 40 thinking they’ll get insider dibs on the pier’s coveted courtyard or rooftop artificial-turf sports fields.

“They should have no special access to the fields,” he stressed. “No, not the same access to the fields as everyone else, because they already will be dominating the pier. Those fields are there for the community — not to make the pier more attractive to a commercial office use. I think that they would really have to be at the end of the line.”

Another big concern for the local leagues, like Greenwich Village Little League and Downtown United Soccer Club, and local schools that use the pier is that the playing fields never shut down.

However, the fear is that a massive Pier 40 project could close the pier for several years, meaning the leagues will have to scramble to find alternative field space.

“They should not close down the fields for construction,” Bergman stressed.

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