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Pier 40 Update

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Development Across From Pier 40 Gets OK From City Council

CIVIC CENTER — The St. John's Terminal development across from Pier 40 inched closer to final approval Monday, when it was voted through two City Council committees.

Under the plan, the developers would construct roughly 2 million square feet of retail and residential buildings in St. John's Terminal after paying $100 million for Pier 40 air rights. The money would pay for critical repairs needed at Pier 40. 

The zoning subcommittee voted it through first, followed by the land use committee. The full Council is expected to vote on the project later this month.

► READ MORE: Here's How the St. John's Terminal-Pier 40 Deal Got Done

The approvals came with some hard-fought changes to the plan, negotiated largely by Councilman Corey Johnson, who represents the district where the development will be built.

The development's cellar-level indoor recreation space was increased from 10,000 square feet to 15,000, and will be open to public during all of its operating hours.

The number of parking spaces included in the development was slashed from 772 to 425, and retail spaces were limited to 10,000 square feet, except for one 25,000-square-foot space. The limitation does not apply to grocery stores, food halls or spaces with fitness or recreation use.

► READ MORE: St. John's Terminal Developers Outline Changes to Proposal

In a win for the Hudson River Park, the St. John's Terminal developers will pay the full $100 million for Pier 40's air rights at the closing of the deal, rather than over three years, and even agreed to put the full sum in escrow prior to the full City Council vote later this month.

Johnson said he also secured an additional $14 million from the city "to ensure the long-term sustainability of Pier 40."

The developers also promised to provide some funding for a new crosswalk to Pier 40, though the exact amount has not been specified.

The Hudson River Park Trust and the developers were happy with the vote. 

HRPT President and CEO Madelyn Wils said the new agreement to bring money to repair Pier 40 sooner will ensure "urgently needed repairs to the pier's piles will be made, and the pier will stay open."

And the developers, in their own statement, thanked the committees "for their support, and Councilmember Johnson and his staff for working so hard with us to reach an agreement that works for the community and the project."

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The Fun Zone

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The Fun Zone

The Fun Zone

Stuart Fern on Physical Education 

In addition to his role as DUSC Coach, Stuart Fern, of B2001 Orange, is a physical education teacher and coach of Avenues, a private school in Chelsea for students ranging from pre-kindergarten through high school. Stuart is a passionate advocate for innovation in physical education and, at Avenues, he has a developed a curriculum strongly rooted in wellness and movement. 

Stuart graduated from Sheffield Hallam University with a Masters in Sports Science and Teaching Degree, after having also represented the school on its soccer team. He moved to London to work at the American School London, coaching the Girls Varsity Soccer Team, Rugby and Track and Field. While there he was introduced to the European Council of International Schools (ECIS) and their Physical Education Conference. He proceeded to present at this conference on many wellness and movement topics, and served on the organizing committee for three years before coming to the US.

The reason I moved to Avenues was because I had a passion to innovate and implement a Physical Education and wellness program that reflected the modern times in which we live. The school encourages innovation and supports teachers in being bold and taking risks. To that end, we have rebranded our subject, and we now call our subject “Wellness and Movement” or “WAM”. This is a holistic approach to health and well-being that also seeks to overlap themes in the class room. Positive psychology is a key newcomer to our curriculum, in which students are taught how to reflect on their current situations and how to identify if they are flourishing. We give them tools to improve happiness and well-being, through topics such as using character strengths, finding flow, gratitude, empathy, optimism, growth mind sets and flourishing. Mindfulness is a key theme through out and students are taught how to be mindful and meditate to help them make positive decisions and reduce stress. We believe mental fitness is as important to train as physical fitness. Exercise science and healthy eating are key aspects that are covered with topics framed in a positive way. Instead of calorie counting, we give the students simple, achievable ideas and skills to make healthy decisions in environments to which they will be exposed. Socio-emotional aspects of the students lives are discussed holistically so they see how their decisions are interconnected.

I always get asked why call it “Movement”. I tell people that, as I have taught and coached middle school track for ten years, I see that young people are not taught to move correctly and thus have poor running mechanics, poor functional movements, coordination, strength and agility.  Also by moving away from an all sports PE model we remove the stigma of being an “athlete” versus being a “nonathlete” or “sporty” versus “nonsporty”. Each child develops a foundation to be a confident mover by developing functional movements — squats, lunges, push-ups, strength through yoga poses, speed and agility — and by working on manipulation skills like throwing, catching and other sport-specific skills. The goal is that they will have the physical capabilities to make positive movement choices as they get older. Traditional sports are still taught, but by providing more choice the chances of students finding their passion for movement increases. 

Recently I have been looking at how organizations in the fitness industry, such as Crossfit and Soul Cycle and have managed to create such a positive communities; this is something schools can learn from. My work at DUSC has also given me insight on how to build a community that has strong core values and a dedication to making progress towards a goal. 

Building a love for movement starts with fun and what I call being in the “Fun Zone”. It is my job to make sure the kids are all “smiling and sweating”  whilst becoming better movers — and better people. Ensuring every child is challenged appropriately, is encouraged to take risks, encouraged to self-improve whilst building grit and resilience is what helps to send the kids on the journey to a healthy and happy life. 

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A Great Start to Our Fall Season

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A Great Start to Our Fall Season

Our 2016 Fall season is off to a great start, with more athletes of all ages playing, learning and having fun, than ever before. Program Director Adam Norse took some time from his busy schedule to share some thoughts about the club.

Can you give us an overview of programs currently offered by DUSC?

We currently have programs for all ages (birth years 2011 to 1998), experience and ability levels. These include fall and winter recreation leagues, instructional classes, camps, and — in partnership with NYCFC — schools program. For our advanced players, we have an academy program.

What is the DUSC approach to soccer education?

Primarily, DUSC hires coaches who we feel will be inspiring role models to our players and who promote positive character traits — working hard, being coachable, learning from mistakes, sportsmanship, and resilience. Soccer gives us a privileged opportunity to influence the lives of our players. By creating a positive learning environment, we look to challenge our players at every opportunity. Our approach is for players to have maximum touches of the ball so they become confident with it at their feet. After a solid base has been established, we can then move onto more advanced aspects. Whilst sessions are challenging, they are also fun and engaging. We know that players learn through repetition and that repetition leads to mastery. The key thing for us is that players fall in love with the game, regardless of their skill level. Once a player sees that through hard work and focus they can improve and we, as coaches, can then help them grow and develop as players. 

What do you feel is the most important factor when coaching soccer?

As mentioned above, players need to have fun and be challenged. Having fun without getting players out of their comfort zone doesn't really help them. That said, for me, the most important factor when coaching soccer is patience. Players all have different learning styles and speeds. It is vital that we give our players time to learn and attempt to implement their newly learned skills with confidence.

What is the difference between the Recreation League, Classes & Academy? 

Our Recreation League provides an opportunity for players to play games against other players/ teams. The league emphasizes skill development, team play and sportsmanship through small-sided games in a positive and supportive environment. The Recreation League is coached by volunteer parents with an emphasis on fun and learning. DUSC Classes are taught by professional coaches and our classes  provide a gateway for the dedicated recreational player to our more competitive programs like the Academy. Classes are 10 weeks in duration and curriculum-based. Skills are taught in a focused environment. Advanced classes are also offered for the more skilled players for supplemental training.  Managed by a staff, the Academy is a 10 month program is geared towards the complete development of high level players looking to progress to the collegiate level and beyond. We have helped develop players into college, professional clubs and the US youth national teams. 

What is unique and special about DUSC?

Above everything, DUSC is a community soccer club. Regardless of a player's experience, skill level, or background, there is a home for them within DUSC up to age 18. We have programs for players new to the game, for advanced players and for those that want to simply play with their friends. Scholarships are available for all players who require financial support; we make soccer accessible for everyone. Our coaching staff come from all over the world and reflect the diversity of New York City. In addition, we also aim to give players an opportunity to give back to the community through refereeing, community service and coaching.  We care about each players progress through the club both on and off the field.  

Can you tell us more about your schools program in the Lower East Side?

DUSC uses soccer to educate students in the Lower East Side about healthy eating and lifestyle habits. In partnership with New York City Football Club, DUSC identified six young leaders (aged 16-20) to set up and run a soccer program for elementary schools (PS 110, PS134 and PS20). Through this program we are able to tackle obesity and health issues whilst also equipping, training and growing young leaders. Two of our young leaders recently went to the Global Youth Summit in Manchester (UK) to meet with other young leaders from across the world. You can find more about that at www.cityzensgiving.org

What are the biggest challenges of running soccer programs in the city?

Our number one issue is space, both outdoor and indoor. All our programs are pretty much at capacity right now and in order to impact more players through soccer we need to find more fields and school gyms to use. Also, we also want to continue offering soccer to everyone, regardless of their financial standing, so we are always looking for sponsors, both individual and corporate. If anyone can help in either of these areas they should definitely let us know!

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Anya Augustine Wins Inaugural “I am DUSC” Essay Contest

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Anya Augustine Wins Inaugural “I am DUSC” Essay Contest

DUSC is delighted to announce that Anya Augustine, a player on Coach Leah Loguidice’s G2005 Blue team, is the first winner of our inaugural “I am DUSC” essay competition. In addition to Anya, other division winners were Ryan Marrus (1998-2002) and Lucas Schaeffer (2006-2008). Following are Anya's inspiring words.

Having good character is key to being a soccer player. Having good character is key because playing soccer requires being committed to soccer, hard-working, you have to have good sportsmanship, you have to be supportive, and, most importantly you have to have fun and love the game. Those are all things that are a part of having a good character as a soccer player. 

Having good character means to have good sportsmanship. The game may be going in your favor or it might not be. It's important to stay positive, and try your best. Having good character also means being a supportive team member. Your teammates will be with you for a while so it's important that you support them, and yourself. It will help you and your team members improve as soccer players. 

Aside from being supportive and having good sportsmanship, having good character means to be a hard worker. Soccer requires a lot of commitment and a lot of hard work. It's important to push yourself and your teammates to work harder than you did last practice. 

Having good character also means to be respectful. If you are respectful to your team it will help you bond with them and become a stronger team. You have to be kind to your teammates and coaches and respect their wishes. And, although it's very important to respect your team members and coaches, it's also extremely important to respect yourself. It's extremely difficult to improve as a soccer player if you're constantly putting yourself down. You have to acknowledge that you're making progress and respect yourself. 

Having good character definitely means to have good sportsmanship, be a supportive team member, work hard and be very respectful. However, having good character as a soccer player most importantly means to have fun. Soccer is a sport in which you learn, make new friends and have fun. It's important to have fun because it makes soccer practice more enjoyable for you and your friends and, you will improve as a soccer at a much faster rate. every day if you show up to date soccer with a smile on your face, shows that you're excited to learn and improve and keep playing soccer. 

In conclusion having good character is very important to being a soccer player and, have a good character means a lot to me. It means to be supportive, hard-working, respectful, and to have good sportsmanship and most importantly to have fun. DUSC has taught me so much about having good character as a soccer player, and I will continue to improve my characteristics and I will continue to grow as a soccer player. 

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DUSC at the 2016 Surf Cup

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DUSC at the 2016 Surf Cup

This August, Coach Alex Cuba’s DUSC Blue team traveled to San Diego to compete in the Surf Cup, one of the country’s toughest and most prestigious tournaments. 

Their trip, a DUSC swan song for some, combined sun and surf with the soccer. Off-the-pitch highlights included the beach, the San Diego zoo, an Italian meal overlooking the Pacific and a Mexican meal serenaded by mariachis. The players’ favorite, however, was SoCal standard In-and-Out Burger, which they visited on their return trip to the airport.

At the Surf Cup, the team played in Men’s U19, “up” a year for most players. It was a tough bracket. After one win and one tie, they lost to Diablo FC from Contra Costa, CA— a team rated 19th in the nation — and were eliminated.

Below is Coach Cuba’s perspective, inspiring to players on any team.

 

A soccer player’s ability on the field is quantified by how good their control of the ball is, their ability to pass the ball accurately, their speed of play, their ability to put the ball in the back of the net or their ability to keep the ball out of the net, and so on. The one trait that is never on the stat sheet — the one characteristic that is hardly mentioned when measuring a player’s ability to play at the next level — is their heart. In my opinion, a player’s intestinal fortitude is what separates the great players from the average. 

As I looked out onto the field at the Surf Cup, this past season, this past year, I saw my DUSC U17s take the field and play their hearts out, over and over again. I would look out onto the field and be literally amazed on a game-by-game basis, by how hard they were willing to work for one another, by their effort to ensure that they were there for one another, or by their lack of fear of any opponent or moment. I looked out onto the field and saw a field of giants. I looked out onto the field with great pride at being associated with this group of extraordinary young men.

Success in sports is often measured by wins and championships. I admit that I am guilty of constantly measuring my own success as a coach and as a player by how many Ws my teams put up. This is simply my competitive nature and my natural disdain to losing in any form of competition. I have always wanted all my players to experience success the way I did during my younger playing days because the memories of those championships last for eternity. It was no different for this current group of boys. In fact, I don’t think I have ever wanted a group of my players to win and achieve success more than these boys. 

In my speech at the end of the tournament, after being eliminated by a very talented team, I did what any coach that cared would do. I tried to console my boys and tell them that they gave everything they had and that’s all we can ask from them. Due to me being a player still, I knew those words would not ease the pain of being knocked out of the tournament they worked so hard for. 

We went on and enjoyed the rest of our trip, but the fact that once again we came up just a couple minutes short of winning and advancing still lingered inside me. During one of our many talks, my brother, whose opinion I value and cherish, told me he was proud of the job I had done with this group because of the camaraderie they had, the heart and desire they played with and how they enjoyed playing for me. 

That resonated with me quite a bit. But it wasn’t until the flight home that I realized we did it. We were successful!! Two years ago this team came to me with just a simple desire to play the beautiful game of soccer believing that they were just another group of friends getting an opportunity to play together for the fun of it. Fast forward to the Surf Cup and this is now a team with a determination to reach the highest level they could possibly reach, an insatiable desire to be the best team they could be and ambitions to one day be called a champion. They not only want to be a called a champion one day but now they expect it. 

It is with great humility and gratitude that I say to you, my boys of the DUSC U17 Blue, Thank You!! Thank you for an incredible weekend! Thank you for an incredible season! Thank you for an incredible year! Thank you for inspiring me to want to be better simply by your desire to want to be the best. To Mert, David, Liam and Danny – while you are moving onto your next stages in life, know that you have left your imprint in my life and I hope I have left mine in yours. Good luck to you!

 

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DUSC Appoints Jose Luis Rebay as Technical Director

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DUSC Appoints Jose Luis Rebay as Technical Director

DUSC is proud to announce the appointment of Jose Luis Rebay as Technical Director, Boys 2006–1998 as well as Head Coach, B2002 Blue.

“Coming from South America, I like to play a very skillful game with European flavor mixed in,” Jose said. “Keeping the ball on the ground, and letting our quality of player use their individual talents on the field will dictate how we approach the game. We want to be able to set the pace and give our players the best chance to succeed.”

A native of Buenos Aires, Argentina, Jose was a youth and senior player with Independiente de Avellaneda in Argentina from 1979 to 1986 and a member of the Argentina U17 Youth National Team. He competed in pro soccer in Bolivia (Universitario de Sucre) before playing for the San Diego Sockers in the Western Soccer League, serving as a midfielder for the WSL championship squad in 1989. The next year, he moved to New York and played for Inka of the Hellenic-American Soccer League, Ragusa of the Italian-American soccer League plus the New Jersey Nationals during the 1990’s.

He has coached Long Island Junior Soccer League (LIJSL) teams in Dix Hills, HBC and Massapequa during the past decade, winning three State Cup Championships, a Region I League Championship and National League Championship along the way. Most recently, Jose's U16 Dix Hills team were finalists in the USYSA National Championship this summer.  Coach Rebay currently serves as a Region 1 ODP coach, and has been a member of Eastern New York ODP and served as eastern New York's ODP's Technical Director.

In addition, Jose has coached college soccer as Head Men’s Coach of Coach of the New York City College of Technology and Head Mean’s Coach of the College of Staten Island men.

"Jose brings experience, success and a shared philosophy to the club", says Tom Frambach, General Manager at DUSC.  "Working alongside Gustavo Palomino (TD - Boys 2010-2007), Arman Osooli (TD - Girls), Kei Kinoshita (TD - Sports Performance) and Luis Ramos (TD - Goalkeeping) I feel we have a fantastic technical staff."

Please join us in welcoming Technical Director Jose Luis Rebay.

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DUSC Scores in generation adidas international Select Nominations

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DUSC Scores in generation adidas international Select Nominations

Downtown United SC sweeps up a combined three generation adidas international players, sending two players to A.F.C. Ajax Select in Amsterdam and one to Realmadrid Foundation Select in Madrid for an invitation only training experience from August 14–21. 

ATLANTA, GA - For the last nine years, generation adidas international has partnered with premier adidas clubs to develop U.S. youth soccer at the international level through its Select programs. Talented players are invited to train at the Realmadrid Foundation, A.F.C. Ajax, and F.F.C. Frankfurt, three of the world’s most powerful soccer clubs. 

Each year, the top adidas clubs nationwide have the exclusive opportunity to nominate players to participate in the program. This summer, 96 talented players from some of the nation’s best clubs will take the field in Europe, training with top quality European academy coaches and playing against academy teams.

This year Downtown United SC is proud to announce that Guillermo Purchese Escudero and Ryan Contreras have been nominated for two of the 32 spots for the A.F.C Ajax Select Program, and Josh Newman has been nominated for one of 32 spots for Realmadrid Foundation Select Program. In addition, Kei Kinoshita, DUSC Technical Director of Sports Performance and Head Coach of B2005 Blue and B2004 Orange was selected to be a Head Coach of the program, with fellow NYCFC affiliate coaches Luis Mendoza of TSF and Ray Selvadurai of MSC. 

Guillermo and Ryan will have the opportunity to experience the culture of soccer at one of the most prestigious Dutch clubs — A.F.C. Ajax.  Ajax is among the most successful teams in Europe and is a true powerhouse in European football. They have won 32 Eredivisie League Championships to date, 18 Netherland Cups, 8 Netherland Super Cups, 4 UEFA Champions Leagues, 1 UEFA Cup, 2 EURO Super Cups and 2 Intercontinental Cups. As one of the world’s top clubs, they are known for their fast, open, and creative style of play. 

Through Realmadrid Foundation Select, Josh will experience one of “the world’s most successful clubs”, according to FIFA, home to football superstars like Gareth Bale. Real Madrid C.F. has won a total of 32 La Liga titles, 11 Copa Del Rey titles, 11 UEFA Champions League titles, 2 UEFA Europa League titles and 2 UEFA Super Cup titles. This once-in-a-lifetime opportunity takes place at Real Madrid City’s training facility, and provides an inside look into the daily life of a Realmadrid Foundation Academy player.

generation adidas international prides itself on opening doors to players who wish to develop themselves at the elite level. Billy Hartman, CEO, says that the experience “opens their eyes and ignites their ambition to get to the next level — players return to the U.S. going into their development academy, ECNL, or regional season with a better understanding of what it takes to become professional players.” 

About generation adidas international: generation adidas international’s extensive catalogue of programs features access to the world’s top professional academies and tournaments. With generation adidas international, premier adidas partners have access to world-class developmental opportunities with our international training programs, Select Training Programs, and coaching education courses.  With generation adidas international, the world of adidas soccer opens its doors for your club. Where will you play?

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My Belgium Experience

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My Belgium Experience

Players from the boys DUSC 2004, 2003 and 2002 age groups combined for a-once-in-a-lifetime international experience this summer in Europe. The trip included stops at some of the top youth clubs in Europe, including Club Brugge and RSC Anderlecht, along with training from youth coaches of the the Royal Belgium Football Association (RBFA). They competed in competitive matches and had a chance to see live games in France during the European Championships, most notably the epic quarterfinal between Wales and Belgium.

My Belgium Experience

by Aidhan Astrachan, B2002 Blue
 

I really enjoyed going to Belgium and playing against local teams. I think it was a great experience for me and for all the other players who went on the trip. I thought that it was a lot of fun to meet some of the younger DUSC players and play with them.

I liked the training sessions. It was interesting to see the difference between how DUSC coaches and Belgian coaches coach. My favorite part of the trip was playing in the games. The games were entertaining because it was cool to see how club teams in Belgium play; actually, our third game was against a Dutch team. One of my most memorable moments during the trip was in our second game and we were losing 2–0, and then I scored and then later assisted a goal to put our team back at 2–2.

Another memorable moment was when we went to the Euro 2016 quarterfinal Belgium v. Wales game in Lille, France. We saw a really nice goal by Radja Nainggolan, maybe one of the best goals of the tournament. The atmosphere at the game was a lot of fun and the game was one of the best. Seeing players like Gareth Bale live was very impressive. Our bus had a flat tire before we left the hotel, but luckily we still made it on time. 

Overall I loved the trip and I hope that I will be able to go on another trip like this one.

DUSC-Belgium-trip-06.jpg

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Coach Jack Stefanowski at Puerto Rico FC and the Puerto Rico Men’s National Team

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Coach Jack Stefanowski at Puerto Rico FC and the Puerto Rico Men’s National Team

Coach Jack Stefanowski has enjoyed some very exciting times since leaving DUSC this fall, and our disappointment at seeing a beloved coach move on can be tempered by pride and joy in what he is accomplishing. Hired as Assistant Coach for the new Carmelo Anthony-owned NASL squad Puerto Rico FC, Jack was also recently appointed as Interim Head Coach for the Puerto Rico Men’s National Team. He is approaching both roles with gusto.

Jack has been “a familiar face on the island” since Coach Colin Clarke recruited him to be Goalkeeping Coach, then Assistant Coach, for the Puerto Rico Islanders in 2008. Back then, the Islanders were the highest ranked team in Puerto Rico and Jack helped lead them to the semi-finals of the CONCACAF Champion’s League. Now Puerto Rico FC are the commonwealth’s top club and Jack and Head Coach Adrian Whitbread are even more ambitious. Currently in the midst of pre-season, they are training hard and scrimmaging as much as possible. Recently they played the Costa Rico Men’s National Team to a 3-3 tie. And this Saturday, June 11, they play Jack’s “other team”—the Puerto Rico Men’s National team—in what is being billed as the “Clásico de Futbol.” The game will kick-off at 7:30 at Belson Stadium on the Campus of St. John’s University, and is scheduled to occur the weekend of the Puerto Rican Day Pride Parade.

There are very acute differences between coaching a club team and a national team, differences that are probably more obvious when you’re doing both simultaneously. “Coaching a club is a job you do every day. You keep doing the work, keep plugging away, and you make things work better. Coaching a national team there is not much time. You need to get the most out of each player in a very brief period.” Apparently Jack is doing just that. Puerto Rico has advanced to the finals of the Caribbean Cup, a qualifier for the Gold Cup. Another highlight was scrimmaging against the USMNT; they lost that game 3-1, “entirely respectable given the FIFA rankings and population numbers.”

The Puerto Rican Men’s National Team is the second national team Jack has coached. Prior to joining DUSC he was Head Coach of the Nepal Men’s National Team. Despite the vastly different cultures, he sees many similarities in terms of their soccer. “There is a lot of potential for both nations. A lot of passion and many young and talented players.”

Jack’s success coaching at the youth, college, professional and national levels may be attributed to his general underlying philosophy. “It’s all about managing people,” Jack said. “The information will vary from one type of club, or one level, to another, but — in the end — it’s all about managing people. Managing people and building relationships.”

 

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DUSC Joins New York City FC for City Select in Manchester

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DUSC Joins New York City FC for City Select in Manchester

DUSC is proud to share that Academy Technical Director Gustavo Palomino and three of our Boys 2004 players — Ben “Zico” Altman, Aidan Clelland and Mohamed Kuessom — were selected by New York City FC’s Youth Technical Director Rodrigo Marion to participate in their inaugural City Select program. Youth teams composed of 2003 and 2004 players from affiliate clubs traveled to Manchester, trained in Man City’s premier training facility and scrimmaged against Man City youth teams as well as other EPL academies. For each team, two coaches from the youth affiliate teams were asked to coach alongside Marion.

NYCFC started the City Select training program as a way of getting some of the best players from their youth affiliate teams to play together as a team, and expose them to the very high level of training of a professional environment. It is their philosophy that Academy selection should not be made until U14 as players are developing at different rates, and long travel distances put a lot of strain on them academically and socially. Though selection to City Select does not guarantee a player a spot in NYCFC's Academy, it is a way of getting some of these players together at an early age so that they can start to gel as a team.

Along with training and playing together, the players watched professional games — including, for the 2003 players, the first stage of the Man City/Real Madrid Champion’s League semifinal. These experiences, along with traveling, living and eating together, helped bond the players and expose them to the world of professional soccer.

According to Gustavo, ”It was as great a learning experience for the coaches as it was for the players.” And as the players bonded, so did the coaches, being immersed in Man City culture, philosophy and methodology — and learning lessons they can bring back and share with all of DUSC.

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DUSC Spring Classes

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DUSC Spring Classes

Our DUSC Classes have continued to grow and are now an integral part of the club's programs. This spring we had almost 500 players enrolled into our weekday and weekend class program. 

DUSC Classes run in the fall, winter and spring. They are curriculum-based and run for 10 weeks. Over the duration of a class, players will cover the key fundamentals of the game, including; dribbling, turning, passing and shooting. Sessions are highly interactive and challenging for players. With everyone having a ball we strive to create an environment where players can grown, learn new skills and learn from mistakes, all while they are having fun and making new friends. Classes are suitable for players from beginner to advanced.

Each class session has a specific theme for the day and begins with approximately 15 minutes of skills and ball mastery where players learn to be comfortable with the ball at their feet. We then focus on technique/mechanics and really break down the specific skill, part to whole. Once players are familiar with the skill we then look to introduce some competition and pressure; this might be working in pairs or as part of  larger team. All the time we are encouraging our students to try new things and step outside their comfort zone. We reinforce the fact that it is ok to make mistakes and that learning from them is part of the process. All classes finish with a game played with restrictions, e.g., teams must make X passes before they can shoot, or a player scores additional points if they complete a "fake".

Following the DUSC club-wide curriculum, our classes are aimed at helping players build up their base level of soccer skills. Coaches look to challenge each player according to their own skill level.

Our classes are available for Ages 4–14. We offer Co-Ed and Girls classes. In addition we also have Advanced and Goalkeeper classes for players with more experience who are looking to take their game to the next level. 

 

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DUSC Parents Night May 2016

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DUSC Parents Night May 2016

At the DUSC May Parents Meeting, a packed house reflected the club’s growing enrollment and thriving spirit. Guests enjoyed wine, beer, food and great company as they learned about the organization’s latest developments and future plans. 

Among the items discussed were:

  • The New York City FC Affiliation and City Select
  • Growing enrollment and financials
  • The state of Pier 40
  • The new concussion study
  • New health and safety protocols
  • Fundraising
  • Red Nose day
  • The Board
  • New US Soccer Initiatives

A highlight of the evening was an unannounced guest appearance by soccer’s very own Captain America, Claudio Reyna — Sporting Director of New York City FC, formerly captain of the USMNT and Red Bulls, and star of Man City and Rangers FC. Claudio discussed the NYCFC affiliation, the City Select program and his philosophy of youth development.

As the evening came to a close, our “graduating class” was introduced and saluted, with several discussing their history at the club and what the game has meant to them. In the words of Technical Director Gustavo Palomino, “The greatest trophies I have won at this club are the young men and women who have come through it.”

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DUSC at City in the Community Youth Summit

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DUSC at City in the Community Youth Summit

Diana Salinas, an 11th-grader from Edward R. Murrow high school in downtown Brooklyn, has been chosen to represent DUSC and City in the Community New York at a Global Youth Summit in Manchester. She will meet other young leaders from across the world, share ideas and receive training on how to continue impacting our local communities through soccer.  

What is your background with DUSC?
I've worked as a counselor for their summer camp for 2 years, volunteer for events they need help with, currently working for Citizens Giving program as a DUSC coach.

What exactly is the City in the Community program?
City in the Community is a partnership between  NYCFC and DUSC. We are using soccer to educate elementary school students on healthy eating , nutrition and healthy lifestyles. DUSC choose young leaders (aged 16-21) from across the club to run and the deliver the program in Lower East Side in schools with a 97% + free school meals rate (PS 20 and PS 110)

Why is healthy eating and healthy lifestyle important?
Good nutrition is an important part of leading a healthy lifestyle. Combined with physical activity, your diet can help you to reach and maintain a healthy weight, reduce your risk of chronic diseases (like heart disease and cancer), and promote your overall health and well-being.

What are your biggest highlights of the program so far?
Biggest highlight from this program so far was a festival we held at Yankee Stadium in March before the home opener v Toronto. it was a challenge for the young leaders but it was also a huge success as it brought together students and parents from across the city.

Do you think the program is positively impacting the students?
I believe that this program is positively impacting the students because,they become a little more aware about whether or not their  food choices are good or bad. Also lets them know why it's important to maintain a healthy lifestyle and what impact those choices have in later life.

How has being part of the project helped you?
Being part of this project has helped me focus on what I want to do in the future, such as coaching. I've learned a lot new things from other young leaders like me and I believe I'm ready for more great experiences.

Why is soccer such a powerful tool for educating and inspiring students?
Soccer is a powerful tool for educating student because in soccer you learn about great sportsmanship, communication and how to be aware to what's going on around you. This can not only follow through with a persons on the field but also in one's life. 

What would you like to do in the future?
In the future I would like to stay in the sports management field. Because of this program it has inspired me to actually become an official soccer coach soon. 

Why is DUSC special to you?
DUSC is special to me because they have given me the opportunities to work for their summer camp for 2 years in a row, given me other job opportunities like work for the fall and spring recreational leagues. When I'm given the opportunity to work with all these kids, they don't just learn from me, I learn from them as well. And the coaches there give me advice on how to improve as a player, person and coach. Something I value and appreciate everyday.

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Growing DUSC Girls Program

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Growing DUSC Girls Program

DUSC's burgeoning Girls program has enjoyed tremendous growth in the past two and half years, but — more important to Technical Director Arman Osooli — it's growing in "the right way." 

Arman attributes the growth to the program's origin in a club with a perennially strong Boys program, along with other programs specifically for girls, like the Rec League and classes (headed by Program Director Adam Norse) and the strong community nature of the club itself. 

The "right way", to Arman, means adherence to DUSC's player-centric philosophy and a creative, attacking style of play. The girls have fun while they learn. The club's affiliation with MLS club New York City FC has been helpful as well; through NYCFC they are the beneficiaries of a training curriculum from Manchester City, one of England's best professional women's teams.

The traction the program is making has allowed Arman to recruit college women's coaches for his older girls' teams. Nate Rauscher is Mt. St. Vincents head coach, while Jen Leaverton and Michelle Wilson are assistant women's coaches at St. John's and LIU Brooklyn, respectively. Arman himself was previously Head Coach at Sarah Lawrence. This experience coaching at the college level means that the girls are exposed to a different level of professionalism now — and they are better prepared to play in colleges in the future.

Tryouts for DUSC Girls teams will be held during the month of May.  

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DUSC Moms + Dads

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DUSC Moms + Dads

Did you know we offer pick up soccer for DUSC Moms and Dads? 
Stay active and enjoy the spring season with fellow parents and community members. 

DUSC Moms
Wednesdays, 8:30-10pm Pier 40 Roof
For more information, Contact Shannon at shanncarr@gmail.com

DUSC Dads
Sundays,  7:30-9pm Pier 40 Courtyard.   
For more information, contact Paul at coachpaul@zyya.com 

 

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Parent Night at DUSC

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Parent Night at DUSC

DUSC will be holding its annual 'Parent Night' on Wednesday, May 4th 6:30pm at  at PS 3 School for all parents in the club. 

We encourage all parents to attend as we will discuss information for the upcoming 2016-2017 year and beyond. This a parent meeting only. No players please.  

Food and drinks will be served.

#WeAreDUSC

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Marrus Raises $10,000 for City in the Community

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Marrus Raises $10,000 for City in the Community

Last month, Ryan Marrus a member of the BU14 Blue travel team (featured above to the far right) had the experience of a lifetime at Yankee Stadium during the season finale against the New England Revolution.  He got a chance to meet some of the players on the field following the match including Josh Saunders, Poku, Pirlo, and many others while being honored for his service to the community. 

As a volunteer coach he has raised more than $10,000 to support City in the Community after school programs.

Ryan tells us about his story:

When I first started with DUSC as a 7 year old, I met Paul Jeffries, then a coach with Downton United Soccer Club.  By the time my brother joined DUSC and my dad began coaching in the recreational program, we were all close friends with Paul.  A couple of years later, when he mentioned that he and some of the other coaches also coached kids through a program called City Soccer and that, if I was interested, he could use my help one Saturday morning.

Around November 2014, I reached out to Paul to see if I could help out on a more regular basis. I had heard of City Soccer through some friendlies that we played with them when I was younger. It took a little work to get started.  The first time I went it was a rainy day almost no one showed up.  I then teamed up with Adolfo Lee at PS 134 and was hooked.  I started by working with a small group of kids aged 5-8, working on some skill development and small-sided games.

As I started preparing for my bar mitzvah, my parents and I started talking about my service project, traditionally conducted at some point during the year leading up to the actual ceremony.  Continuing my work with City Soccer, now City in the Community seemed like a natural fit.  With the backing of the new NYCFC team where Paul Jefferies was now head of Community Affairs, the program seemed stronger than ever and I was enjoying it more and more. I could see the progression of these kids' skills. 

I did not expect to keep doing it for more than a year, but as these kids showed more and more improvement from my coaching it became very rewarding.  When the season ended at the end of the school year, I had a real connection with the kids and a real sense of accomplishment. 

At the same time, City in the Community started a program called the healthy hat trick, where they teach kids about good eating, and exercise habits through soccer. It was then that decided to, ask people, instead of gifts for my bar mitzvah, to consider a donation to City in the Community.  I already thought of it as my service project, but I then realized that I could help these kids even more.  Just as Paul and Adolfo had done for me, I could help them develop good habits that would that would help them with life not just soccer.  

As the donations started coming in, the response was amazing and I raised more money than I had ever expected.  Even though my bar mitzvah was back in June, I still get up every Sunday I don't have a soccer game, and head over to meet up with Adolfo and the kids for a couple of hours.  I originally thought of it as service, but now I really enjoy it. They now all know me. Since I coach the kids up to third grade, the kids who I coached last year who were the older and more skilled in the group enjoyed being at the top. Now they wish they were still in my group, since they are now playing with kids up to the age of thirteen or fourteen. It feels really nice to know that they valued and enjoyed having me coach them, since they are always telling me they want to still be in my group.

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U17 White at West Point

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U17 White at West Point

On Saturday Oct 31st, the DUSC U17 White team traveled to West Point to open their fall season with a friendly match against the US Military Academy Prep School. While at West Point the team had the opportunity to play in front of the coaching staff for West Point and Boston University.

After playing the prep school, DUSC players had an opportunity to tour the historic campus and have lunch. The day concluded where DUSC players watched an NCAA division 1 matchup where Army hosted Boston University.

Overall it was great day for the team, giving a more personalized experience to the college recruitment process versus the "college showcase" tournaments most teams in the age group compete in.

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DUSC Summer: International Trips

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DUSC Summer: International Trips

This has been a very busy summer, full of activities and trips abroad. Our team worked hard to organize tours to expose our players and teams to unique experiences that will follow them for the rest of their lives, on and off the fields.

The U14 Girls team traveled to Guatemala for the second ever Community Service Trip that took them to several cities including Guatemala city and Antigua. They have played scrimmages and donated soccer equipment to remote villages in Santa Cruz. Coaches Arman, Stephanie and Vince led the team. Special thanks to Luis for guiding us. Go to Xela-Aid to find out more about his work. Take a look at our pictures here.

Our U14 Corinthians travel team embarked towards the United Kingdom, stopping by England and Scotland. Stepping foot at the Etihad Stadium was an amazing experience. We also toured Manchester, Glasgow and Edinburgh. There were competitive matches and training sessions. But the experiences gained in foreign countries where football has a longer tradition, is something that our player will cherish for the rest of their lives. Check out the official blog by Brian Fingeret.

Finally, the U15/16 travel teams began their adventures in Madrid, Spain. Both teams stayed and trained at the Spanish Federation grounds and the Real Madrid City of Football. In addition, several games with local teams gave both teams a hard test. These were 10 intense days of high quality training and games. But it wasn't all work, we had the opportunity of visiting the cities of Toledo and Segovia. We ended the trip with a game at the Santiago Bernabeu between Real Madrid and Betis. Our Travel Director Matt Pilkington praised the group that represented themselves and the club with great esteem and was very respectful leaving a great impression. Read our blog and check out our pictures here. Full image gallery on our Facebook album here.

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DUSC Summer: Summer Camp

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DUSC Summer: Summer Camp

The 2015 DUSC Summer Camp came to an end with yet another record in attendance! We had 1568 registrations! Thanks to all families for trusting us year after year. We strive to provide the best experience and memories to all our campers that come from all corners of the city and from abroad.

Our coaches and counselors did an outstanding job teaching the game and mentoring our young campers. Thanks for always giving more!

We hope that our campers had a blast, learned more about the beautiful game, learned individual and team values as well as making new friends. See you all next year!

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